10 beautiful and safe houseplants for cats

10 beautiful and safe houseplants for cats

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Threshold bird’s nest fern

Bird's nest fern

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Threshold bird’s nest fern

This fern with wavy leaves thrives in high humidity and indirect sunlight, making it an ideal choice for your bathroom. To ensure your plant thrives, be sure to water it at least once a week, but do not water directly into the center of the plant, as this may cause the plant’s dense nest to rot.

Spider factory

Flexible and adaptable, spider plants are a great choice for those who don’t have a green thumb. These leggy beauties survive in a range of light conditions and only need watering once a week. Additionally, spider plants have been shown to help remove toxins from the air.

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Calathea torrent rattlesnake

Calathea rattlesnake

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Calathea torrent rattlesnake

This stunning plant gets its name from the creeper-like patterns that adorn its wavy leaves. Although you only need to water the sun-loving plant once a week, it’s a good idea to mist its leaves if they look a little dry or less vibrant. Also, the Calathea rattlesnake exhibits a phenomenon where it moves its leaves from day to night – and your cat is sure to thoroughly enjoy the movement.

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4

Delight with lively tropical roots Guzmania bromeliad

Tropical delight guzmania bromeliad

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Delight with lively tropical roots Guzmania bromeliad

Add a little tropical flair to your living room with the help of bright bromeliads. Place your plant near a bright window and water it only once a month. This will encourage its flowers to bloom as brightly as possible. You should also be prepared to mist your plant often, as bromeliads naturally thrive in high-humidity climates.

5

Pilea peperomeoides plant

Pilea peperomeoides plant

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Pilea peperomeoides plant

The Pilea peperomoides plant, more commonly known as the Chinese money plant, is a popular choice for those looking for something low-maintenance yet eye-catching. Place it in a sunny area of ​​your home and water it only when the topsoil dries out, and you are sure to have a bountiful plant. Pro tip: Peperomides are susceptible to mealybugs, so be sure to wipe down the saucer-like leaves often.

6

Nianthe Bella Parlor Balm

Nianthe Bella Parlor Balm

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Nianthe Bella Parlor Balm

Not all palms are pet-friendly, but the ASPCA says parlor palms are non-toxic to cats. Native to the rainforests of Mexico and Guatemala, the tropical beauty thrives in bright, indirect light. If you notice the tips of the fronds turning brown, this means your plant may benefit from occasional misting.

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Olive Tree

This unexpected choice brings a sense of elegance to the room with its silver-gray-green leaves and sculpted shape. Olive trees need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight to survive, so try to place them near a south or west-facing window. Allow the soil to dry at least halfway through the pot before watering.

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Dark purple orchid

Dark purple orchid

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Dark purple orchid

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It may be a bit high maintenance, but there is no houseplant more sophisticated than an orchid. These flowering plants do best when placed in a warm, humid location in your home that gets a fair amount of indirect light. You can expect the flowers to wilt and fall, but if you continue to take good care of them, they will bloom the following season.

basil

For those who love to cook, basil is a safe and versatile herb to keep on your kitchen counter because it’s non-toxic to pets (even if they decide to take a bite of it). You will need to keep mint and oregano plants out of your cat’s reach, as they can cause digestive problems if consumed.

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This is the heart

Earning its name for its charming shape, the Hoya Heart will add a fun atmosphere to your home office. The succulent plant thrives in bright direct light, but tolerates bright indirect light conditions. It is also best to wait until the soil in the pot is completely dry before watering your hoya.

Photo by Sarah DeMarco

Sarah DeMarco (she/her) is the Associate Editor at VERANDA, where she covers all things design, architecture, art, gardens, jewelry, travel, wine and spirits. She also manages social media for the brand.

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