11 Best Perennials to Plant in Fall

11 Best Perennials to Plant in Fall

While much of fall lawn care involves preparing your landscape for winter, there are some things you can do to prepare your space for spring as well. In fact, fall is a great time to plant all the perennials you want to see thriving in your garden next year. Whether you want to add new bulbs to your flower garden or fill negative space with more foliage, these perennials will give you a stunning display in spring — just be sure to get them in the ground before the end of fall.


Coral bells

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Coral bells (Heuchera americana) It has colorful foliage and delicate flowers that bloom from late spring through summer. “With a range of colors from black to almost black to pink, silver and orange, heuchera adds a pop of color to the garden or serves as a backdrop for a star plant,” says Erin Chanin, partner and gardening innovator at Troy-Bilt. The Impatient Gardener blog and YouTube channel.

  • Growing areas: 5 to 9
  • Mature size: 8 to 12 inches long x 12 to 18 inches wide
  • Growing conditions: Partial shade Rich, organic, well-drained soil



Coneflower

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Native plants are stars in the garden, drought-tolerant, disease-resistant, and welcoming essential pollinators. Coneflower (Echinacea)A popular local plant, it is best planted in the fall. “These perennials add beauty to the garden when they bloom during the summer months,” says Terry Speight, gardener and author. Black Plants: Profiles of Inspiring Black Flower Growers and Florists. “In the fall, I leave the seed heads so they can drop and provide new seedlings, unless birds eat them over the winter.”

  • Growing areas: 3 to 9
  • Mature size: 3 to 4 feet x 1 to 2 feet
  • Growing conditions: Full sun to part shade; Moist, well-drained soil


Russian sage

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If you want to bring beauty and pollinators to your garden, consider planting Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia) – It has silvery foliage and blue-purple flowers. “When gray stems are planted near evergreen shrubs, they add a touch of artistic whimsy to the landscape,” says Speight. “In spring, the basal foliage often increases in size and can be easily divided or pruned.”

  • Growing areas: 4 to 9
  • Mature size: 28 to 34 inches long x 24 to 36 inches wide
  • Growing conditions: bright sun; Well-drained soil


Shasta Daisy

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When planted in the fall, root Shasta chamomile (leukanmom x proud) Able to develop deep in the soil. When the roots grow deep in the ground, the plant won’t need as much water and can therefore withstand harsh conditions, Speight says.

  • Growing areas: 4 to 9
  • Mature size: 6 to 48 inches x 12 to 24 feet
  • Growing conditions: bright sun; Well-drained soil


Black-eyed Susan

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A popular perennial that is planted during the fall is the black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta). The low-maintenance native plant produces bright yellow flowers that form during the summer and continue into the fall.

  • Growing areas: 4 to 9
  • Mature size: 24 to 36 inches tall x 12 to 24 inches wide
  • Growing conditions: bright sun; Well-drained soil



Sea hellebore

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When planning your spring flower garden, you will want to keep hellebore plants (Heleborus) in consideration. These perennials are one of the first plants to flower each year, usually around February. “Different varieties offer flowers in a wide range of colors and shapes, some facing up and others drooping down, but all are cheerful harbingers of the upcoming gardening season,” says Chanin.

  • Growing areas: 4 to 9
  • Mature size: 24 to 36 inches tall x 12 to 24 inches wide
  • Growing conditions: bright sun; Well-drained soil


Mini daffodil

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Miniature daffodils (cyclamen narcissus) It blooms in early to mid-spring, but is best planted during the fall. The plant has eye-catching, long-lasting yellow flowers. They are small enough to add to the front of any perennial or shrub border and are great for rock gardens and containers too. “These bulbs are naturalizers, which means they will reproduce and come back every year,” says PeggyAnne Montgomery, horticulturist and flowerbulbs.com expert. “And best of all, deer won’t eat them.”

  • Growing areas: 4 to 8
  • Mature size: 8 to 10 inches long x 4 inches wide
  • Increased requirements: Full sun to part sun; Average, well-drained soil.


Shopty allium

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There is nothing like this Allium Schubertii (Allium Schuberti). “The flowers radiate from a central, ball-shaped canopy up to 18 inches across with up to 100 tiny flowers,” says Montgomery. “It blooms in late spring to early summer with reddish-purple flowers. The dried flower heads remain attractive and attract attention for several weeks.” Additionally, like all alliums, it attracts pollinators but will not be bothered by deer.

  • Growing areas: 3-8
  • Mature size: 16-18 inches long, 18-20 inches wide
  • Increased requirements: bright sun; Average, well-drained soil


Lily parrot

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“Parrot tulips should be planted where you can enjoy them up close—the flowers have unique serrated blossoms that open in lines of color. They come in every color combination you can think of,” says Montgomery. “It blooms in mid-to-late spring when most other tulips are past their peak. They make wonderful cut flowers.”

  • Growing area: 3-8
  • Mature size: 22″ long x 5″ wide
  • Growing conditions: Full sun to part shade; Average, well-drained soil


Imperial crown

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With long, sturdy stems that produce a crown of fluctuating flowers in shades of orange and yellow, Imperial Crown (Fritillaria imperialis) It blooms in mid-spring and attracts butterflies and other beneficial pollinators. “Plant in groups to attract attention even from a distance,” says Montgomery. “It even helps keep away pesky moles and mice.”

  • region: 3 to 8
  • Mature size: 32 to 40 inches long x 10 to 12 inches wide
  • Increased requirements: bright sun; Average, well-drained soil



Grape hyacinth

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  • Grape hyacinth (muscari) It now comes in all shades of blue, pink, and white (or a combination of hues). “I can’t think of anything easier to grow,” Montgomery says. “They reproduce easily and bloom longer than most bulbs.” Grape hyacinth is great for the front of borders and containers and helps attract pollinators.
  • Growing areas: 4 to 9
  • Mature size: 6 to 8 inches long x 2 inches wide
  • Growing conditions: Full sun to part shade; Average, well-drained soil


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