22 pet-friendly plants safe for cats and dogs

22 pet-friendly plants safe for cats and dogs

There are two things we love most in life: plants and pets. That’s why we look for pet-friendly plants that won’t threaten your little ones if they bite them. For starters, yes, some plants can be toxic to pets when ingested, sometimes causing seizures, tremors, or worse. Even the most well-behaved animals are bound to take a bite out of houseplants at some point, so we reached out to New Jersey veterinarian Judy Morgan to get her advice on how to choose animals that won’t hurt the four-legged friends in our area. Spirits. Since we’re big advocates of adding greenery to your home to clean the air and lift your mood while also making sure your furry friend is safe and sound, read on for 22 of our favorite pet-safe plants that are kosher for cats and dogs. We’ve also included all the tips you’ll need to keep your new plant happy in your home environment.

Note: If you’re curious about whether certain indoor plants are a safe investment for your home, the ASPCA also has an extensive list of plants to avoid (including indoor and outdoor plants). And if you already have an idea of ​​what plants you want in your space, click the link below.

1. Chinese Money Plant (Pilea Peperomioides)

Positives:

  • The foliage is fun and unique
  • Bonus for growth

cons:

  • They tend to grow asymmetrically unless you are diligent in rotating them

The Chinese money plant is non-toxic, whimsical, and produces babies in a way that does not belong to anyone. And imagine what? These babies are called “puppies.” How appropriate. The coin-like leaves are waxy and shiny and quite tolerate medium to bright light. When you see the puppies starting to grow, spread them and give them to your friends.

Care instructions:

Water Bella every week or two, rotating it 180 degrees each time so it grows more evenly.

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2. Money Tree (Bachera aquatica)

Positives:

  • Hardy and resilient plants
  • Fast growers

cons:

Legend has it that money tree plants bring good fortune and luck to anyone who lives in their space, making them excellent housewarming gifts for all your friends. Money trees are different from many other pet-friendly plants because they look like miniature trees, trunks and all. The shiny leaves grow quickly, and the stems are braided several times.

Care instructions:

Money trees are very resilient, so if your cat knocks them over or your dog’s tail knocks them off, it will be okay. Place your plant in medium to bright indirect light and water it every week or two.

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3. Hoya varieties

Positives:

  • Many varieties in all different shapes, sizes and colors to choose from
  • flexible

cons:

With their thick leaves and woody stems, Hoyas make beautiful additions to any high-light rooms in your home. There are dozens of varieties you can choose from, and they should all be treated more like succulents than traditional leafy houseplants. We prefer Hoya carnosa because of its pink, white and red spots in the developing leaves. You can also find heart-shaped hoya, cultivars with skinny, tubular leaves (called Linear hoya), and even hoya with curly, almost ribbon-like leaves.

Care instructions:

If your hoya plant is in a bright corner, it will need more frequent watering. Hoya plants can tolerate low light, but they will grow much faster (and the varietals will have more vibrant colors) in high light situations. However, if your hoya plant is in a low-light area, it only needs to be watered once a month. If the leaves begin to become thin, appear wrinkled, and lose their slight luster, it is time to water.

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4. Rattlesnake plant

Positives:

  • Beautiful, wavy leaves
  • It’s easy to know when they need care

cons:

  • On the difficult side when it comes to the lighting and watering schedule

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