25 best vegetables to plant and grow at home

25 best vegetables to plant and grow at home

1

Broccoli

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Broccoli is certainly delicious and highly nutritious, and a welcome addition to your garden! It is a cool season crop that can thrive in a variety of soil types. Although it will do best in well-drained soil that gets full sun. For best results, plant broccoli at least a foot apart from each other, then be patient! It takes some time to mature, but after you harvest the main head, the plant will continue to produce side shoots that you can enjoy for months to come.

When to plant: Start seeds indoors in early to mid-spring for spring planting and start seeds indoors or outdoors in early to late July for fall.

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2

potato

The best vegetables for growing potatoes
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Potatoes are a versatile vegetable, both in the kitchen and in the ground. You can harvest new potatoes within six to eight weeks of planting or choose later harvest varieties that you can enjoy during an early frost. You can also grow them in pots on a sunny balcony or patio. They need full sun and well-drained, acidic soil. Note: They are susceptible to diseases carried by peppers, eggplants or tomatoes, so do not plant them near or in places where these crops were previously planted.

When to plant: From mid-March to early May, depending on your location.

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3

onion

The best vegetables for growing onions
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It’s hard to think of a more beneficial cooking ingredient than onions, so why not grow your own? You can plant them in the spring for a mid- to late-summer harvest, depending on your climate. You can also plant them in the fall instead, so they remain dormant throughout the winter and emerge in the spring. Make sure to place it in a sunny location with well-drained soil. Onion roots are not good at absorbing water, so the soil must be moist.

When to plant: From late March to early April, when temperatures never drop below 28 degrees Fahrenheit.

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4

Okra

The best vegetables to grow okra
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Although it is more popular in Southern recipes because most varieties like warm weather, there are types of okra that also grow in cooler, northern climates. They only need full sunlight and moist but well-drained soil. Okra grows quickly and often, and its blooming flowers look like beautiful hibiscus! You will love to look at and eat them all summer long.

When to plant: Late April or early May in southern climates for a summer crop or early August for a fall crop. June is best for northern climates.

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5

radish

The best vegetables to grow turnips
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Kale is a cool-weather vegetable that is a great substitute for carrots and potatoes in many recipes. Plus, you can eat both the green tops and root vegetables, making it doubly delicious!

When to plant: A few weeks before the expected last spring frost date for a late spring harvest, late summer for a fall crop, or early fall for a late fall crop.

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6

Bok choy

Best vegetables to grow bok choy
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Increasingly popular in recipes and grocery stores, this Asian cabbage can be propagated from leftover scraps and ready to harvest within a month. They also grow quickly from seed in full sun in about 45 days.

When to plant: Early spring for a late spring harvest or late summer to early fall for a late fall harvest.

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7

radish

The best vegetables to grow radishes
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This hardy root vegetable is a great last-minute crop – and can be ready to harvest as soon as three weeks after planting! Although it is known for its colorful roots, the entire plant is edible.

When to plant: Early April to early May for rabi crop and early August to early September for kharif crop.

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8

Pumpkin

The best vegetables to grow pumpkins
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If you’re debating whether to grow pumpkins in your garden, we have just two words for you: pumpkin pie. You’ll need plenty of space and a long growing season for this winter squash but we like to say, if you have it, plant it!

When to plant: Well after all danger of frost has passed and the soil temperature is between 65 and 95 degrees F.

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9

cabbage

The best vegetables for growing cabbage
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This hardy leafy vegetable thrives with 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight per day, so be sure to provide a sunny spot in your garden if you plan to grow cabbage. Start your seeds indoors for a summer harvest.

When to plant: About 6 to 8 weeks before the last spring frost for the summer harvest.

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10

carrot

The best vegetables for growing carrots
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Did you know that carrots taste sweeter when they are fresh from the garden? This is just one of many reasons to start growing this colorful root vegetable at home. Carrots can be a finicky plant, but if you use mulch and remember to keep the soil well watered during hot spells, you should have a lot of luck!

When to plant: About 2 to 3 weeks before the last spring frost date.

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11

Beets

The best vegetables for growing beets
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These colorful root vegetables are very easy to grow from seed. Beets are a great cool-weather crop because they tolerate frost and near-freezing temperatures.

When to plant: Start in early spring and make successive plantings every two to three weeks until mid-summer.

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12

lettuce

Mesclun lettuce growing in a container
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Gourmet vegetables often go bad quickly in the refrigerator. Instead of picking them up at the store, grow them yourself and you can harvest some leaves right before dinner. Lettuce loves cool weather and grows well when planted as seeds. It is also a great choice for planting in pots and window boxes because the roots are shallow. Keep the plant moist while the seeds germinate, then harvest it when the leaves are a few inches long. If you like variety, choose a mesclun mix that includes several different types of lettuce in one seed packet.

When to plant: Early spring or late summer for fall harvest.

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13

tomatoes

Tomatoes on the vine are in different stages of maturity
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You can grow heat-loving tomatoes from seed, or if you prefer, you can choose tomato transplants, which you will find at local nurseries or online. Pay attention to the type you buy: indeterminate types continue to grow and produce until frost, so their sprawling vines must be planted out – this means they’re not good in containers because they become too heavy. Certain types have fruit that mature in a short period of time, remaining about three to four feet long. Cherry tomatoes are best for beginners, and many newer varieties remain nice and compact so are ideal for growing in containers.

When to plant: After all, the danger of frost has passed.

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14

Bean

Basket of fresh green beans
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Beans come in many varieties, and they are prolific (plus, the more you choose, the more they produce!). Sow seeds directly into the ground because transplants do not usually work well. Look for pole beans, which need plenty of space and a trellis to climb, or bush beans, which grow in a more compact shape, so they’ll work in containers. Read the seed label to find “days to maturity” so you know when to harvest certain varieties – you don’t want to wait too long because they will become tough.

When to plant: After the last frost.

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15

Pepper

Close-up of purple pepper on a tree
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Peppers love heat, and grow well in beds, containers, or on sunny patios and decks. Transplants are a better option unless you have time to start transplants indoors about six to eight weeks before the last frost. Most peppers need to be staked, so make sure you have enough space.

When to plant: After the last frost.

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16

Herbs

Coriander growing in a pot
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Even if you only have a small balcony, you can still grow fresh herbs! It’s so much fun to cut a few leaves for each serving, and it’s much cheaper than buying those expensive packages at the store. Herbs grow equally well in containers or beds. You can grow most of them from seed, but if you’re in a hurry, they’re not as expensive to buy as transplants. Better yet, some herbs, such as chives, sage and thyme, are perennial and will come back next spring.

When to plant: Mid-spring.

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17

option

Cucumbers grown in the greenhouse
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Most cucumbers are heat-loving shrubs, so you’ll need some space to grow them. You can also provide a cage or trellis for them to climb vertically, which will take up less space in your garden. Look for round, yellow, miniature or compact varieties. It is best to sow seeds directly into the ground because transplants can be difficult.

When to plant: After all, the danger of frost has passed.

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18

Swiss chard

Swiss red chard growing in the garden
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This beautiful green has long, elegant leaves with bright ribs of red, yellow, orange or white. Swiss chard is not only delicious, it looks beautiful too! It grows well from seed, so you can plant it directly in your garden. In hot climates, if you give it some afternoon shade, it will produce all the way until the first frost. In the rest of the country, you can pick the outer leaves and they will continue to produce throughout the season.

When to plant: Mid-spring.

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19

cabbage

Close-up photo of growing kale
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This superfood is incredibly hardy and doesn’t mind getting a little cold. In fact, many species will survive the winter and green again in the spring. Cabbage does best in beds, and seeds or seedlings are also good (although seeds are cheaper). However, if you don’t have enough space, you can grow it in containers and harvest it as baby cabbage when it is young and tender.

When to plant: Mid spring or late summer for fall season.

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20

Summer squash

Zucchini growing in the garden
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Most pumpkins are very easy to grow, and you’ll likely end up with plenty of pumpkins to share with friends and family! Summer squash comes in a variety of sizes and types, but they mostly grow on vines that need room to spread. They do well when grown from seed or as transplants (although young plants do not like to have their roots disturbed when transplanted, so be careful when placing them). Keep in mind that these vegetables love heat! Pick them before they become giant otherwise they will become very unnatural.

When to plant: After all, the danger of frost has passed.

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Head shot of Erika Elaine Sanson

Arricca Elin SanSone writes about health and lifestyle topics in the areas of prevention, rural life, women’s day and more. She is passionate about gardening, baking, reading, and spending time with the people and dogs she loves.

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