5 ideas for Chinese New Year flower decorations

5 ideas for Chinese New Year flower decorations

Antique furniture retailer Lynette Wong is still remembering the Chinese New Year celebrations in 2020.

“This was our last big celebration, we had 20 people staying with us, and it was a little crowded but it was a lot of fun,” she recalls.

It was just before the Covid-19 pandemic, when her relatives from Kuala Lumpur and her daughter’s friends from England came for the celebrations, and there was no limit to the number of visitors one could have.

“Chinese New Year is always a family affair, so if it weren’t for the pandemic, we would always have friends and family staying with us,” says Lynette, who lives in a black-and-white house off Alexandra Road with her husband and three children. Big boys.

As has been the case in years past, Lynette’s Chinese New Year celebrations will be a low-key affair, but that hasn’t stopped her from keeping the tradition alive.

1B2G luxury furniture owner

First, decorating the home is essential, says Lynette, who owns a vintage Scandinavian furniture store, 1B2G Important Design, located along 203 Henderson Road.

She takes charge of the decor, and with her keen eye for style, she manages to decorate the house tastefully.

“It’s easy to go over the top and pile on too much red. I don’t want that,” she says. It also helps that her home is filled with antique furniture that complements the festive decor.

Chrysanthemum plant pots

To welcome visitors, there are bowls of chrysanthemums outside the house. Chrysanthemums indicate longevity and are also a symbol of nobility.

Lynette says these flowers are pink instead of the typical mandarin orange because “the squirrels that live in the neighborhood will eat them and make such a mess.”

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Willow pussy

In the foyer, a massive star bench designed by Per Borre for Fredericia takes center stage. This provides another seating space for guests when they come to visit.

On a side table, Lynette placed a willow tree, a box of oranges, and a firecracker ornament on it. A large Chinese knot hangs over the main door, and there are more decorations on the walls to add color to the hallway.

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Here, 1B2G Fine Vintage Furniture store owner Lynette's living room space is filled with designer furniture icons, including 1960s artichoke lights by Poul Henningsen Papa, bear chairs by Hans Wegner, and sofas by Illum Wikkelso.

Peony pots

For her living room, Lynette takes a more subtle approach to decorating, since the space is already filled with plenty of statement mid-century furniture that she pairs with contemporary art.

There are vases of yellow and orange holiday flowers, such as chrysanthemums, peonies and orchids.

Here, Lynette’s living room space is filled with designer furniture icons, including 1960s artichoke lights by Poul Henningsen Papa, armchairs by Hans Wegner, and sofas by Illum Wikkelso.

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In the dining room, Lynette, owner of 1B2G Fine Vintage Furniture, assembles a centerpiece using plum blossoms and peonies.

Plum blossoms

In the dining room, Lynette assembles a centerpiece using plum blossoms and peonies. Featuring a mix of antique furniture and modern art, the dining room is one of the home’s main areas for family gatherings.

Besides the decor, Lynette also takes charge of ordering snacks. One of her must-haves is the pineapple tarts, which she’s been ordering from the same home baker for the past decade. Height cakeAnd Nian Gao Which I got from the Chinese New Year Fair in Takashimaya.

“And of course we cannot forget buck l“Because this is the only time a year we get to have that,” Lynette says.

For meals, her mother cooks, but Lynette helps with marketing.

Her mother prepares a special menu for the reunion dinner and also for the first day of Chinese New Year. The table will be full of dishes such as May fasting or Assam laksaglutinous rice, braised beef, pork stomach with abalone soup, pengcai And Yu Sheng.

“My mom makes every dish from scratch,” Lynette announces proudly.

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Linley's custom-designed veneer screen of the London skyline provides the backdrop for two Chinese New Year flower decorations in the home of Lynette Wong, owner of 1B2G Fine Vintage Furniture.

Chinese New Year flowers

Linley’s custom-designed veneer display of the London skyline provides the backdrop for two Chinese New Year celebration flowers.

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Lo Hei Yu Sheng at 1B2G Fine Vintage Furniture store owner, Lynette Wong's home.

Chinese New Year Lu Hei

Lynette, who grew up in Kuala Lumpur, remembers fondly that when she was younger, Chinese New Year meant driving to Singapore to catch up with her father’s relatives. “We were staying with our aunt who lived in Singapore,” she says.

The tables have since turned. Since her house is spacious, Lynette’s house is now a place for festive meals.

Some other traditions have not changed. The family still makes sure to wear new clothes in festive colors on the first day of Chinese New Year. “ang paos are still given to children and also to the elderly,” Lynette says.

It will still be open to visitors, and as in previous years, a group of close friends will be visiting as well.

“We will be content with smaller groups of visitors during the few days, unlike the large celebrations we held before,” she says.

Despite the muted celebrations, Lynette still considers Chinese New Year one of her favorite times of the year.

“I like it best when it’s mid-February, so the celebrations last longer,” she says. “It’s always fun to celebrate Christmas, New Year, my husband’s birthdays, my birthdays, and then Chinese New Year.”

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Photography by Yin Meng Jin. This article first appeared in The Business Times in 2022.

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