Harry P. Leu Gardens for promotions

Harry P. Leu Gardens for promotions

                There's nothing like Harry P. Leu Gardens in Central Florida.  There is lush vegetation overlooking a beautiful lake.  It's a gift to the city of Orlando to be shared.  But imagine an amphitheater for concerts and a park just for kids.  These are some of the new projects Orlando has planned for the Botanical Garden.  "How many plants are there here?"  WESH 2's Michelle Meredith asked: "Oh, Michelle, we have millions from all over the world," said Jennifer Dollander, CEO of Harry P. Leu Gardens.  Leo Gardens is set on 50 acres of botanical paradise.  Harry P. Leu bought the property in the 1930s and traveled the world collecting plants with his wife.  More than 60 years ago, he donated the land to the city of Orlando.  "What makes it so special is that it's in the heart of the city and our ability to allow people to get lost in the world, in the natural world," Dollander said.  There have been updates to the Botanical Garden over the years, but Orlando is working on a major modernization — collecting bids from businesses to come up with a master plan and improvements to Leo Gardens that will be implemented in phases over a period of years.  What kinds of new things are they looking to build at Leu Gardens?  Butterfly barn, children's garden and amphitheater.  The Leu Gardens border a beautiful lake that can be viewed from a gazebo and boardwalk.  There could be more parking because there is not enough for large events.  “Many of the things we will be looking at will also help generate revenue that will help us continue to share this place and help preserve it for the public,” Dehlander said.  And the public seems to agree.  "I think it's a secret in Orlando," Brighton resident Hildenbrandt said. "It's a great place, and I think the more it gets, the merrier."  The goal is to make Leo Gardens not a secret, but an open gem for more people to enjoy and share.  Before anything happens, the City of Orlando will give the community ample time to provide their input.  TOP HEADLINES: Sheriff says sniper killed bank robber in Florida while holding knife to hostage's throat Sheriff: Man carrying knife shot to death after attacking Orange County deputies Police: Man carrying rifle walking door to door in Altamonte Springs neighborhood shot, killed by officer
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                <strong class="dateline">Orange County, Florida –</strong>                                          <p>There's nothing like the Harry P. Leu Gardens in Central Florida.

There is lush vegetation overlooking a beautiful lake. It’s a gift to the city of Orlando to be shared.

But imagine an amphitheater for concerts and a park just for kids.

These are a few of the new projects Orlando has planned for the Botanical Garden.

“How many plants are here?” WESH 2’s Michelle Meredith asked.

“Oh Michelle, we have millions from all over the world,” said Jennifer Dollander, executive director of Harry B. Leo Gardens.

Leo Gardens is set on 50 acres of botanical paradise. Harry P. Leu bought the property in the 1930s and traveled the world collecting plants with his wife.

More than 60 years ago, he donated the land to the city of Orlando.

“What makes it so special is that it’s in the heart of the city and our ability to allow people to get lost in the world, in the natural world,” Dollander said.

There have been updates to the Botanical Garden over the years, but Orlando is working on a major modernization — collecting bids from businesses to come up with a master plan and improvements to Leo Gardens that will be implemented in phases over a period of years.

What kinds of new things are they looking to build at Leu Gardens? Butterfly barn, children’s garden and amphitheater.

The Leu Gardens border a beautiful lake that can be viewed from a gazebo and boardwalk.

    There could be more parking because there is not enough for large events.  

“Many of the things we will be looking at will also help generate revenue that will help us continue to share this place and help preserve it for the public,” Dehlander said.

And the public seems to agree.

“I think it’s a secret in Orlando,” Brighton resident Hildenbrandt said. “It’s a great place, and I think the more it gets, the merrier.”

The goal is to make Leu Gardens not a well-kept secret but a gem open for more people to enjoy and share.

Before anything happens, the City of Orlando will give the community ample time to provide their input.

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                                </div>        (Tags for translation)Harry P. Leu Gardens

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