We don’t walk like you-oo-oo! Young orangutan orphans are pushed in a wheelbarrow by their “surrogate mothers” at a rehabilitation centre

We don’t walk like you-oo-oo!  Young orangutan orphans are pushed in a wheelbarrow by their “surrogate mothers” at a rehabilitation centre

  • Cute monkeys were also seen hanging from the trees and waiting while their lunch was prepared at the forest school



Baby orangutan orphans have been spotted being pushed together in a wheelbarrow at a rehabilitation center in Indonesia.

The cute monkeys, aged between three and seven, are cared for by surrogate mothers, a practice used at all Borneo Orangutan Foundation Survival Centres.

In addition to being taken on a handcart ride across wooden decks through the rainforest terrain, they are also seen hanging in trees and waiting while the school lunch is prepared in the forest.

Other photos show them playfully posing for the camera and huddled together in a group enjoying each other’s company.

The orangutans are being rehabilitated at the centers in the hope that they will learn natural skills and one day return to the forest.

These amazing shots were taken at two centers in Kalimantan, Indonesia.

Founded in 1991, the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation is the largest orangutan conservation organization in the world.

Orangutans between the ages of 3 and 7 are seen being transported in a rickshaw by surrogate mothers, a practice used for efficiency at all BOS Foundation centres.
Orangutan babies are seen being transported in a wheelbarrow by a surrogate mother through the rainforest terrain of Borneo, Indonesia.
An orangutan dangles and flips between trees at BOS’s Nyaro Menteng Rehabilitation Centre
An orangutan between 3 and 7 years old is seen being carried in a wheelbarrow by a surrogate mother
A group of baby orangutans huddle together in a nursery group at BOS’s Nyaru Menteng Rehabilitation Centre.

Kalanaman (left) and Avo (right), a 3-year-old orangutan in the foster group at BOS’s Nyaru Menteng Rehabilitation Centre, stare into the camera with admiration
Onir, a 3-year-old male orangutan in the nursery group at BOS Nyaro Menteng Rehabilitation Centre, makes a funny face
Greta (right) and Kaladan (bottom), aged about 7, look on as school lunch is prepared in the jungle by a surrogate mother at BOS’s Nyaro Menteng Rehabilitation Center
Payma, a 3-year-old female orangutan, makes a weird face in a forest school moment at BOS Foundation’s Sambuja Lestari Rehabilitation Center
Onir and Afo, a 3-year-old orangutan in the nursery group at BOS’s Nyaro Menteng Rehabilitation Centre, look fondly at
Monita, a 6-year-old female orangutan, looks tired at Forest School Group 5 at BOS’s Nyaru Menteng Rehabilitation Center
Pawn (left), Greta (right) and Kaladan (bottom), aged about 7, look on as their school lunch is prepared in the jungle by a surrogate mother at BOS’s Nyaro Menteng Rehabilitation Center
Jenny pulls a cute expression while participating in forest school activities at BOS Institutions’ Nyaru Menteng Rehabilitation Center

A BOS surrogate mother was seen offering a coconut to an orangutan during jungle school, providing a refreshing experience, as many orangutans in particular enjoy coconuts

Monyo (left) and Jenny (right), both 5 years old, hang from branches at BOS’s Nyaro Menteng Rehabilitation Centre.
An orangutan hangs from a tree while covering his face at BOS’s Nyaro Menteng Rehabilitation Centre

    (Signs for translation) We 

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