When to prune a climbing rose if you want beautiful, scented flowers every year

When to prune a climbing rose if you want beautiful, scented flowers every year

Knowing when to prune a climbing rose is as important as knowledge how To prune one — especially if you hope it steals your spotlight every summer.

Fortunately, this is one of those garden ideas that, once you know what you’re doing, will become almost instinctive from now on. That’s because, unlike many passing garden trends, climbing roses are one of the most popular flowers in history.

When you consider the fact that these fragrant flowers have been in vogue since 2000 BC, it makes sense to know exactly How best to care for them. Especially when it comes to their pruning schedules.

When to prune a climbing rose

When it comes to pruning, it’s best to think of it in the same way as pruning: it’s the easiest way to make sure your climbing rose grows well. And The flowers are beautiful every year.

And let’s face facts, that’s all we really want from our beloved roses, whether we’re trying to recreate Britney Spears’ garden rose arch, create a romantic Italian Nonna Chic garden, or just make them part of our front garden ideas.

A balcony with a pergola covered with vines, climbing roses and a potted lemon tree. Romantic Rose Garden, summer residence of Elena Pelletra. Villa near Lucca in Tuscany, Italy.

Honestly, you can’t really go wrong with these relatively easy-to-climb plants, as long as you’re prepared to give them the TLC they need on a regular basis: think deadheading, watering, and of course, that important annual pruning.

Fortunately, Monty Don – as in the same gardening guru we look to for advice on all things garden-related, be it on how to take cuttings or when to cut hedges – is here to help.

While the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) advises pruning your garden rose sometime between December and February, after flowering, Monty takes a different approach to things.

A garden with climbing roses

A garden with climbing roses

Monty insists that October is the best time to prune climbing roses, explaining that “climbing roses flower on shoots that grew in the same spring so can be pruned hard now.”

Scattering roses, on the other hand, “produce their flowers on shoots that grew the previous summer, so they should only be pruned immediately after flowering,” he adds.

Christopher O’Donoghue, co-director of Gardens Revived, considers October to be the best time for anyone trying to decide when to prune a climbing rose.

The photo shows the side wall of a house, weathered and decorated, taken from the side of the road.  Climbing roses and hydrangeas cover the walls.  Lovely clipped hedges beyond.  Taken in the spring of June 28, 2023 near Salisbury, Wiltshire, United Kingdom.

The photo shows the side wall of a house, weathered and decorated, taken from the side of the road. Climbing roses and hydrangeas cover the walls. Lovely clipped hedges beyond. Taken in the spring of June 28, 2023 near Salisbury, Wiltshire, United Kingdom.

“October marks the end of the rose growing season in the UK as the weather starts to cool,” explains Christopher.

“Pruning at this time allows the plant to focus its energy on root growth rather than new growth, which is important for winter hardiness and overall plant health – it also helps remove any remaining diseased or dead wood from the plant, reducing the risk of infection.” Diseases during the winter.

If you’re still thinking about when to prune your climbing rose, it’s good to know that doing so in October helps reduce the risk of frost damage, which helps improve the overall appearance of the plant the following spring/summer.

Your pruning equipment:

Felco Model 14 Scissors, Red

Hailed as the ultimate gardening tool for any hobby gardener, the Felco range of shears are ideal for pruning climbing roses.

However, it may be worth considering a pair of scissors if you need to cut anything thicker than your finger, adds Christopher.

“Although October is a good time to prune climbing roses in the UK, it is important to bear in mind that specific pruning practices can vary depending on the type of climbing rose and local climate conditions,” adds Christopher.

“Always refer to the specific instructions provided for your particular rose variety, and adjust your pruning schedule accordingly if necessary.”

How difficult is it to cut a climbing rose?

With climbing roses, you can usually be a little more aggressive than you think when it comes to trimming.

“When it comes to pruning a climbing rose, it’s best to start with all three,” says Christopher. “The dead, the sick, the damaged – always start with these areas first.”

Monty Don agrees, noting that you can “start by removing any damaged or crossed growth or any very old wood, which can be cut down and put back in the ground.”

“The main stems should be spread as evenly spaced horizontally as possible, and tied to wire or trellis,” he adds. Then, once that’s done, you can turn your attention to all the side shoots growing from these main stems, cutting them back into short, two-leaf stubs.

“The effect should be decorative of largely horizontal growth with side shoots trimmed along its length,” explains Monty, who says you should always finish things off by tying everything up firmly to avoid winter damage.

How do you prune an old, overgrown climbing rose?

Again, you’ll need to stick to all three, and start by cutting off all dead, diseased, dying and weak shoots on your climbing rose.

“Once you’ve done this, you can cut some of the old woody branches down to the ground, but try to keep about 5-6 of the younger stems and secure them to the supports,” says Christopher.

“Reduce limbs by less than half (just over a third), and be sure to remove dead stems at the base of your climbing rose, as they can rot and spread disease.”

What is the difference between a climbing rose and a wandering rose?

“Melancholy roses tend to only bloom once, but you get a very large display of them,” says Christopher.

“Climbing roses, on the other hand, tend to bloom throughout the summer and fall months – which means you’ll need to deadhead them regularly if you want lots of beautiful blooms.”

As always, there are exceptions to this rule, so be sure to check any instructions for your item.

You may also like...

Leave a Reply