Winter tulips are blooming all over the world, thanks to a tulip workshop taught by Vermonters

Winter tulips are blooming all over the world, thanks to a tulip workshop taught by Vermonters

                As snow covered the ground at Von Trapp Flowers in Waitsfield on a sunny February morning, signs of spring were already blooming inside one of the property's many greenhouses.  "Here we are standing in a sea of ​​18 boxes of tulips. Each box has 66 bulbs, so you have to do the math. There's a lot here in this small section," said Emily Von Trapp, owner of Von Trapp Flower Company.  Von Trapp figured out how to turn her seasonal flower farm into a year-round operation by being able to grow tulips in the winter.  This is no easy feat for a farmer in the Northeast, where there is a shortage of native flowers — flowers grown at this time of year: “I can grow five times more flowers in the winter than I can in the summer,” von Trapp explained.  Von Trapp is able to do this because of a unique technology where it carefully controls the temperatures in its multiple plants.  Greenhouses, which force tulips to bloom.  “It's this constant movement and rotation, or we refer to it as tulip tetris because we're constantly moving the boxes from one point to another,” von Trapp said.  She has been experimenting with growing winter tulips for more than a decade.  This year, von Trapp expects to plant 200,000 lavenders of more than 100 different types.  “The world is very much like our oyster in the world of tulips,” von Trapp said.  What makes the von Trapp operation so special is that it is not selfish in its success.  Von Trapp and her business partner teach other flower growers their method through the Tulip Workshop.  People who visit the site can sign up for classes, ask for advice, and find local farms that grow winter tulips.  Ella Price of Boardwalk Acres in Hardwick is one of a handful of farmers who have attended von Trapp's classes, and says the skills she has learned have given her business a boost.  “The first quarter is better than we did the year before,” Price said.  It goes without saying that Price views The Tulip Workshop as a game-changer.  After successfully planting about 6,000 bulbs last year, she expects to grow 20,000 bulbs this year.  She has a lot of space. “I've already outgrown my space, so now I have to figure out (how to expand),” she said.  Von Trapp said he knows that Tulip Workshop helps other flower farms meet their orders and make their dreams come true.  Something to be forever grateful for.  “It makes me feel overwhelmed that these (workshop participants) are able to do this and are able to grow flowers for the community and be able to promote their own business. I know how hard it is to try to be a small-scale flower farmer in this day and age. So,” von Trapp said. "Seeing that success is like yeah, I feel a little choked up because I know that my business partner and I played a small part in that and that's beautiful to me." Thousands of winter tulip bouquets are finding their way into new homes all over the world. Von Trapp Flowers in Waitsfield Closed in front of the public, but the bouquets are sold in more than a dozen markets throughout Vermont. Von Trapp also offers a winter tulip CSA, which she said sold out this year. They typically come online in late fall, Burdock Acres offers Tulip shipping, and packages are also available for purchase in many stores in the northeast of the Kingdom. 
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                <strong class="dateline">Waitsfield, Vermont —</strong>                                             <p>As snow covered the ground at Von Trapp Flowers in Waitsfield on a sunny February morning, signs of spring were already blooming inside one of the property's many greenhouses. 

“Here we are standing in a sea of ​​18 boxes of tulips. Each box has 66 bulbs, so you have to do the math. There’s a lot here in this small section,” said Emily Von Trapp, owner of Von Trapp Flower Company. .

Von Trapp figured out how to turn her seasonal flower farm into a year-round operation by being able to grow tulips in the winter.

This is not easy for farms in the Northeast, where there is a shortage of locally grown flowers this time of year.

“I can grow flowers in winter that are five times larger than I can grow in summer,” von Trapp explained.

Von Trapp is able to do this thanks to a unique technique in which she carefully controls the temperatures in her multiple greenhouses, which forces the tulips to bloom.

“It’s this constant movement and rotation, or we refer to it as tulip tetris because we’re constantly moving the boxes from one point to another,” von Trapp said.

She has been experimenting with growing winter tulips for more than a decade.

This year, it expects to plant 200,000 lavender bulbs of more than 100 different types.

“The world is very much like our oyster in the world of tulips,” von Trapp said.

What makes the von Trapp operation so special is that it was not selfish in its success.

Von Trapp and her business partner teach other flower growers their method through a tulip workshop.

People who visit the site can sign up for classes, ask for advice, and find local farms that grow winter tulips.

Ella Price of Boardwalk Acres in Hardwick is one of a handful of farmers who have attended von Trapp’s classes, and says the skills she has learned have given her business a boost.

“Last year was our first year of growth, and we did 40 percent more sales in the first quarter than we did the year before,” Price said.

It goes without saying that Price views The Tulip Workshop as a game changer.

After successfully planting about 6,000 bulbs last year, she expects to grow 20,000 bulbs this year.

They have plenty of flower bouquets available for Valentine’s Day.

“I’ve already outgrown my space, so now I have to figure out (how to expand),” she said.

Von Trapp said knowing that the Tulip Workshop is helping other flower farms fulfill their orders and dreams is something she is forever grateful for.

“It makes me feel overwhelmed that these (workshop participants) are able to do this and are able to grow flowers for the community and be able to promote their own businesses. I know how hard it is trying to be a small-scale flower farmer in this day and age,” von Trapp said. So to see that success means I’m feeling a little choked up because I know that my business partner and I played a small part in that and that’s beautiful to me.”

They are just as beautiful as the thousands upon thousands of winter tulip bouquets that find their way into new homes all over the world.

Von Trapp Flowers in Waitsfield is closed to the public, but bouquets are sold at more than a dozen markets throughout Vermont.

Von Trapp also offers a CSA of winter tulips, which is sold out this year. It usually comes online in late fall, she said.

Burdock Acres offers a lavender shipping service. Packages are also available for purchase in many stores in the northeast of the Kingdom.

                                </div>        (tags for translation)Bouquet

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